Panicum virgatum 'Rotstrahlbusch'
Common Name: switch grass
Type: Ornamental grass
Family: Poaceae
Zone: 5 to 9
Height: 4.00 to 5.00 feet
Spread: 2.00 to 3.00 feet
Bloom Time: July to February
Bloom Description: Pink-tinged
Sun: Full sun to part shade
Water: Medium to wet
Maintenance: Low
Suggested Use: Rain Garden
Flower: Showy, Good Cut, Good Dried
Leaf: Colorful, Good Fall
Other: Winter Interest
Tolerate: Drought, Erosion, Dry Soil, Wet Soil, Black Walnut, Air Pollution

Culture

Easily grown in average, medium to wet soils in full sun to part shade. Tolerates a wide range of soils, including dry ones, but prefers moist, sandy or clay soils. Tolerates occasional flooding. May flop in overly rich soils. Generally performs best in full sun. Will grow in part shade, but begins to lose its form in too much shade, growing more openly and possibly falling over. Grows primarily in clumps, but will slowly spread by slightly creeping rhizomes. Cut back clumps to the ground in late winter to early spring. Plants may self-seed in optimum growing conditions but cultivars may not come true from seed.

'Rotstrahlbusch' does not come true from seed and self-seeded plants may be best removed from a planting to preserve the uniformity of the foliage color.

Noteworthy Characteristics

Panicum virgatum, commonly called switch grass, is a Missouri native ornamental grass which was an important component of the tallgrass prairie which once covered large areas of the State. It occurs in both wet and dry soils in prairies and open woods, gravel bars and stream banks and along railroad tracks throughout most of the State. Switch grass is generally noted for its stiff, columnar form, and typically retains its vertical shape throughout the growing season. It is a clump-forming, warm season grass which typically grows to 3' tall. When in flower, flower panicles may bring total plant height to 6'. Features medium green leaves which turn yellow (sometimes with orange tints) in autumn, fading to tan-beige in winter. Foliage clump is topped in mid-summer by finely-textured, pink-tinged, branched flower panicles which hover over the foliage like an airy cloud. Panicles turn beige as the seeds mature in fall with the seed plumes persisting well into winter. Seeds are a food source for birds in winter.

Genus name comes from an old Latin word for millet.

Specific epithet means twiggy.

'Rotstrahlbusch' is noted for its excellent burgundy-red fall color. It typically grows in an upright, vertical clump to 3' tall (to 5' when in flower). Stems typically retain vertical form without flopping throughout the growing season and into winter. Features silver-green leaves which begin acquiring reddish tones in mid-summer as it gradually changes to burgundy-red by autumn. Foliage fades to tan-beige in winter.

Problems

No serious insect or disease problems. Some susceptibility to rust, particularly in hot and humid summer climates. Crown or root rot may occur, particularly as a result of improper growing conditions. Japanese beetles, thrips and spider mites may appear.

Garden Uses

Accent, group or mass. Also effective as a screen. Perennial borders, wild gardens, native plant gardens, prairies, meadows or naturalized areas. Also appropriate for water gardens, bog gardens and along ponds.