Spiraea japonica 'Walbuma' MAGIC CARPET
Common Name: Japanese spirea
Type: Deciduous shrub
Family: Rosaceae
Zone: 3 to 8
Height: 1.00 to 2.00 feet
Spread: 2.00 to 3.00 feet
Bloom Time: June to October
Bloom Description: Bright pink
Sun: Full sun
Water: Medium
Maintenance: Low
Suggested Use: Hedge
Flower: Showy
Leaf: Colorful, Good Fall
Attracts: Butterflies
Tolerate: Deer, Erosion, Clay Soil, Air Pollution

Culture

Easily grown in average, medium moisture, well-drained soils in full sun. Tolerates light shade. Tolerates a wide range of soils. Prefers rich, moist loams. Remove faded flower clusters as practicable (light shearing is an option) to encourage additional bloom. Flowers on new wood, so prune in late winter to early spring if needed. Plants can be aggressive self-seeders, and have escaped gardens and naturalized in many areas of the eastern U.S. Plants will also spread in the garden by suckering.

Noteworthy Characteristics

Spiraea japonica, commonly called Japanese spirea, is a dense, upright, mounded, deciduous shrub that typically grows 4-6’ tall with a slightly larger spread. Leaves (to 3” long) are oval and sharply-toothed. Tiny pink flowers in flat-topped clusters (corymbs) cover the foliage from late spring to mid-summer, with sparse and intermittent repeat bloom sometimes occurring. Flowers are attractive to butterflies.

Genus name comes from the Greek word speira meaning wreath in reference to the showy flower clusters seen on most shrubs in the genus.

Specific epithet means of Japan, which is part of its native range.

'Walbuma', commonly sold under the trade name MAGIC CARPET, was bred by David R. Tristam of Walberton Nursery in West Sussex, England. It was selected from third generation seedlings of self-pollinated Spiraea japonica 'Goldflame'. 'Walbuma' is a compact and spreading shrub with terminal clusters of small bright pink flowers. Its young shoots and leaves are red and mature to variations of gold, depending on light. In full sunlight, mature leaves are golden; under partial shade, mature leaves are greenish gold; and in dense shade, mature leaves are bright green. Fall coloration is a rich russet. 'Walbuma' is considerably shorter than its parent plant, growing 1 to 2 ft. tall and 2 to 3 ft. wide. United States Plant Patent #PP9,363 awarded November 7, 1995.

Problems

No known serious insect or disease problems. Spireas are generally susceptible to many of the diseases and insects that attack other rose family members, including leaf spot, fire blight, powdery mildew, root rot, aphids, leaf roller and scale.

Garden Uses

Specimen or group for rock gardens. Mass or group in shrub border. Low hedge for path and walkways. Incorporates well into foundation plantings.