Solidago ulmifolia

Tried and Trouble-free Recommended by 1 Professionals
Species Native to Missouri
Common Name: elm-leaved goldenrod
Type: Herbaceous perennial
Family: Asteraceae
Native Range: Eastern and central North America
Zone: 3 to 8
Height: 1.00 to 3.00 feet
Spread: 1.00 to 3.00 feet
Bloom Time: July to October
Bloom Description: Yellow
Sun: Full sun to part shade
Water: Medium
Maintenance: Low
Suggested Use: Naturalize
Flower: Showy
Attracts: Butterflies
Tolerate: Deer, Drought, Clay Soil, Dry Soil

Culture

Easily grown in average, medium moisture, well-drained soils in full sun to part shade. This is a woodland species that does well in a sun dappled part shade. Established plants tolerate some dry soils. Plants may be easily grown from seed and may self-seed in the garden. Established plants may spread by rhizomes to form colonies.

Noteworthy Characteristics

Solidago ulmifolia, called elm-leaved goldenrod, is a rhizomatous perennial that is native to dry woods in Eastern North America. In Missouri, it typically occurs in dry or rocky open woods, along sparsely wooded bluffs, along streams, and in thickets throughout the State (Steyermark). It grows 1-3' (sometimes to 4') tall on generally erect stems that often arch at the top. Stems are clad with coarsely-serrate, ovate to lanceolate, green leaves (to 5" long) that are glabrous above and slightly pubescent beneath. Leaves purportedly resemble leaves of the elm tree as commemorated by this plant's common name. The central stem of this plant typically terminates with a branching panicle of yellow-flowered racemes. Additional smaller racemes may develop in the upper leaf axils. Flowers bloom late summer to early fall (July--October). Flowers are attractive to bees and butterflies.

Genus name comes from the Latin words solidus meaning whole and ago meaning to make in reference to the medicinal healing properties of some species plants.

Specific epithet means elm-leaved (Ulmus).

Problems

No serious insect or disease problems. Rust may occur. Watch for powdery mildew and leaf spot. Plants will spread by rhizomes and self-seeding in optimum growing conditions.

Garden Uses

Interesting goldenrod for native plant gardens, woodland margins.