Hesperaloe parviflora
Common Name: redflower false yucca
Type: Broadleaf evergreen
Family: Asparagaceae
Native Range: Southwestern Texas, Mexico
Zone: 5 to 10
Height: 3.00 to 5.00 feet
Spread: 4.00 to 6.00 feet
Bloom Time: July to August
Bloom Description: Red to pink
Sun: Full sun
Water: Dry
Maintenance: Low
Flower: Showy
Leaf: Evergreen
Attracts: Hummingbirds, Butterflies
Other: Winter Interest
Tolerate: Rabbit, Deer, Drought, Erosion, Dry Soil, Air Pollution

Culture

Easily grown in dry, sandy, sharply-drained soils in full sun. Thrives in hot, dry, desert conditions, but is also surprisingly winter hardy to USDA Zone 5. The key to growing this plant well is having superior soil drainage. Excellent heat resistance and drought tolerance. Will self-seed in the landscape. May be propagated by clump division.

Noteworthy Characteristics

Hesperaloe parviflora, commonly known as red yucca, coral yucca, hummingbird yucca, redflower false yucca, and samandoque, is a yucca-like evergreen perennial succulent. It is native to the Chihuahuan desert in western Texas south into northeastern Mexico where it is typically found growing in desert areas, prairies, rocky slopes, and mesquite groves. Although it is closely related to yuccas, it is a member of the century plant family not the yucca family. Narrow, arching, sword-like, blue-green leaves (2-3’ long but only 1” wide) grow in basal clumps to 3-4’ tall spreading to 6’ wide. Although the leaves are evergreen, they often acquire purple or reddish-bronze tints in cold winter climates. Each leaf has distinctive thread-like marginal hairs. Red to pink tubular flowers in branching inflorescences rise well above the foliage clump on red flower stalks to 4-6’ tall. In cold winter climates, flowers bloom in early to mid summer with frequent rebloom into fall, but in warm winter climates plants often bloom earlier with continued bloom occurring throughout much of the year. Excellent hummingbird plant.

Genus name comes from the Greek word hesperos meaning western in reference to the plant being native to North America (in the West) and aloe in reference to the plant somewhat resembling plants in the genus Aloe.

Specific epithet comes from the Latin parva meaning small and flora meaning flower in reference to its small flowers.

Problems

No serious insect or disease problems. Deer like to feed on the flower spikes. Aphids often appear when flowers are in bloom. Watch for scale.

Garden Uses

Desert gardens, rock gardens, path margins. Also can be massed for enjoyment of its long summer bloom. Good large container plant.