Summer Outreach Programs
Summer Outreach Programs for Early Childhood

Kids investigating broccoliEarly Childhood Outreach group size is up to 20 students.

Availability
Early Education Outreach Programs are available year-round between the hours of 9 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Programs run between 45 and 60 minutes.

Fee
Pricing is $100 per class of up to 20 students, $50 for additional classes conducted on the same date in the same location. A maximum of three outreach programs may be scheduled on a single day.

Questions? Call (314) 577-5185.

Schedule a program online!

Offerings
Child with MagnifierA Garden Sensory Adventure (PreK)
Explore the five senses with the Missouri Botanical Garden! Using songs, literature and plant smelling stations, your students will learn which part of the body is responsible for each sense and discover the wonderful world of plants. Each student will plant basil seeds and receive a special five senses journal to take home and share with their parents.

Bee on flowerHoneybees Abuzz (PreK–Grade 1)
Explore the simple, natural process of pollination! Have you ever stopped and watched honeybees in action? Has it made you think about what the bees were doing and why? Read a vibrantly illustrated story, observe a honey hive found in an old log, become pollinating bees, dance like the bees and put your fun facts about bees into song. An informational booklet will go home with students so they can share what they learned with others at home!

 

Sustainability Outreach Programs

The EarthWays Center offers a variety of sustainability outreach programs for students in grades K–12. Students will not only deepen their understanding of the selected topic, but will enhance process skills important to both science and math.

Please call (314) 577-0207 for more information or to schedule a sustainability outreach program. Ask about bringing the EarthWays Center's longer-term sustainability programs to your school.

Choose from the following topics (click on a topic title to reveal class options and additional information):

Air Quality Topics (3–12)

In the Air
Grades 3–5
1 hour

Call (314) 577-0207 to schedule.
  St. Louis Arch obscured by hazeStudents will read part of a fictional story where a group of students explore the sources of pollution within their community and learn what choices people make to protect air. Teachers will also choose which connecting activities we will cover during the visit, including: a mapping activity demonstrating the affect of wind on the transport of air pollutants; a health activity where students make observations to determine that pollution may not always be easy to detect; and/or a social studies component focusing on historical air pollution events in St. Louis.

In the Air
Grades 6–8
1 hour

Call (314) 577-0207 to schedule.

  Wind blowing smoke from smokestackStudents will play a group game demonstrating the impact of individual decisions on air quality. Teachers will also choose which connecting activities we will cover during the visit, including: a mapping activity demonstrating the affect of wind on the transport of air pollutants; a look at hazardous materials commonly used in the home, including testing and comparing non-hazardous and hazardous household cleaning products; and an activity that mimics pollutants in the environment requiring the students to identify and determine the possible dispersal of air pollutants.

In the Air
Grades 9–12
1 hour

Call (314) 577-0207 to schedule.

  SmokestackStudents will take a social science approach and investigate a continuum of common beliefs about the seriousness of airborne toxics—from minor problems to critical issues. Teachers will also choose which connecting activities we will cover during the visit. All of the 9–12 connecting activities cover a different point in the continuum, including: The magnitude of airborne toxics problems is greatly overstated; why worry? What you don’t know won’t hurt you; Airborne toxics are a nuisance but they only affect a few; Airborne toxics are a serious problem but I’m not responsible; and Airborne toxics are a critical problem but the effects may be remediable.