Miscellaneous

Following is information on some common non-plant pests and problems that are often associated with homes and gardens.

Specific pests

Other images

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Benign fungal growths in potting mix
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Benign fungal growths in potting mix
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Lichen on Eastern red cedar (Juniperus)
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Epicormic shoots on red maple (Acer rubrum)
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Close-up of epicormic shoots on red maple (Acer rubrum)
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This is not a nest of eggs but a nest of stinkhorn mushrooms about to rupture from the "eggs"
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The "eggs" of a stinkhorn mushroom
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The black coating at the tip of this stinkhorn mushroom is a spore mass which will quickly liquify and collapse like those on each side of it.
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The stinkhorn mushroom, a natural part of the decay process, on the verge of collapse; once these orange stems appear, they last only a few hours
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Shelf mushrooms can often be seen growing on dead stumps and branches. These cause no harm and are in fact simply part of the natural decay process.
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The fruiting bodies of this Xylaria fungus poking up through leaf debris on a forest floor give it its common name--dead man's fingers
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Dead man's fingers, the fruiting bodies of a Xylaria fungus, are harmless partners in the natural decay process
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The needles of Eastern white pines (Pinus strobus) are attached to twigs in clusters or bundles of five needles.
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Fasciated stem of lemon cucumber (Cucurbita)
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Fasciated stem of lemon cucumber (Cucurbita)
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Grafted plants, like this weeping cherry, sometimes have growth from the root stock below the graft union, called a reversion. This growth will be unlike the purchased plant and should be pruned out before it takes over the plant.
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Dead man's fingers, the fruiting bodies of a Xylaria fungus, are harmless partners in the natural decay process
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Dead man's fingers, the fruiting bodies of a Xylaria fungus, are harmless partners in the natural decay process
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Dead man's fingers, the fruiting bodies of a Xylaria fungus, are harmless partners in the natural decay process
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Lichen on tree trunk
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Lichen on tree trunk
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Mutation on dwarf Alberta spruce (Picea) or possibly a section of the plant is reverting to its non-dwarf parent
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Mutation on dwarf Alberta spruce (Picea) or possibly a section of the plant is reverting to its non-dwarf parent
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False morel mushroom (Gyromitra esculenta); not recommended for human consumption
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False morel mushroom (Gyromitra esculenta); not recommended for human consumption
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Sport (reverting) on Chamaecyparis obtusa 'Nana'
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Sport (reverting) on Chamaecyparis obtusa 'Nana'
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Suckers on roses (Rosa) that originate from the root stock below the graft should be removed. They will be different in form and/or flower color.
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Fasciated lily (Lilium); cause unknown
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Fasciated lily (Lilium); cause unknown
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Thatch in lawn grass is a layer of living and dead grass crowns that resembles peat moss.

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Epicormic shoots on oak (Quercus)
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Ear of corn (Zea mays) genetically modified without a husk
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Seeds sprouting in tomato (Lycopersicon)
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Close-up of seeds sprouting in tomato (Lycopersicon)
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Close-up of seeds sprouting in tomato (Lycopersicon)
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Stunted leaves on ash (Fraxinus) cause unknown compared to normal leaves
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The orange strands (fungal rhizomorph) in the root zone of this Japanese blood grass (Imperata cylindrica 'Rubra) are not a problem and in some cases can be beneficial
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Mushrooms called the "egg" of Dictyophora ravenelii, are often found in lawns but are not harmful; this one has been sliced in half
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Close-up of the interior of a mushroom often found in lawns and called the "egg" of Dictyophora ravenelii; outer layer is jelly-like
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Lichens, shown here on Fraser fir (Abies fraseri), are not harmful or pathogenic, but thick growths can indicate serious problems--a tree that is under stress, dying or not growing properly
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Lichens growing on Fraser fir (Abies fraseri)
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Lichens, here on Fraser fir (Abies fraseri) are compound organisms consisting of a fungus and a green alga living in symbiotic union
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Lichen growing on Fraser fir (Abies); lichen cause no harm to a tree but if very thick can indicate a tree that is not growing
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Lichen growing on Fraser fir (Abies)
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Cultivars like this seedless sweet gum (Liquidambar styraciflua 'Rotundiloba') with rounded lobes sometimes have branches that revert to the original species with pointed lobes; the cause is unknown
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Yellowed, bleached leaves of holly (Ilex sp.) of unknown cause
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Yellowed holly leaves (Ilex sp.) with bleached blotches; cause undetermined
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Bleached, yellowed holly leaves (Ilex sp.) of undetermined origin
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Comparison of lawn grasses: from left zoysia, buffalograss, fescue in early October
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Comparison of lawn grasses: from left zoysia, buffalograss, fescues in mid-November
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Mushrooms, including this stinkhorn, are part of the normal decay process and are often found in mulch.
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The stinkhorn mushroom, a natural part of the decay process, has a foul odor, as the name implies, foul enough to attract flies.
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Zoysia grass in dormancy, December, 2012
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Dormant zoysia on the left, fescue (Festuca) on the right, December, 2012
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Dormant zoysia on the left, fescue (Festuca) on the right, December, 2012
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When a section of purple-leaf ninebark (Physocarpus opulifolius 'Diabolo') reverts to green, simply prune out the reversion.
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Variegated tapioca (Manihot esculenta 'Variegata') reverting back to no variegation.
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Suckers coming up around a a rose bush (Rosa). These should be pruned out.
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Dead and peeling bark on a young tree
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When dead and peeling bark was removed from a young tree, extensive damage was revealed.
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Bark is beginning to grow back around extensive damage, but the damage is too severe to save the tree.
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Overgrown Norfolk Island pine (Araucaria heterophylla). A small pot is essential in keeping this plant, small and manageable.
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Fruiting bodies of a benign fungus in potting mix
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Inside of a mushroom log
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Inside of a mushroom log
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Mushrooms on a mushroom log
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Mushrooms on a mushroom log
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Mushrooms from a mushroom log
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Possible fresh water bryozoan, a.k.a., moss animal. This is a mass of invertebrates that filter water.
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Royal blue fungus on dogwood (Cornus)
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Royal blue fungus on dogwood (Cornus)
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Royal blue fungus on dogwood (Cornus)
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Dwarf Alberta spruce (Picea) reverting to its non-dwarf parent. These reverted sections should be pruned out as soon as they appear.
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Root suckers, like those surrounding this tree, should be removed as they appear.
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Deadman's fingers (Xylaria polymorpha)