Agastache foeniculum

Tried and Trouble-free Recommended by 2 Professionals
Common Name: anise hyssop
Type: Herbaceous perennial
Family: Lamiaceae
Native Range: North America
Zone: 4 to 8
Height: 2.00 to 4.00 feet
Spread: 1.50 to 3.00 feet
Bloom Time: June to September
Bloom Description: Lavender to purple
Sun: Full sun to part shade
Water: Dry to medium
Maintenance: Medium
Suggested Use: Herb, Naturalize
Flower: Showy, Good Cut, Good Dried
Leaf: Fragrant
Attracts: Hummingbirds, Butterflies
Tolerate: Deer, Drought, Dry Soil

Culture

Easily grown in average, dry to medium moisture, well-drained soils in full sun to part shade. Best in full sun. Performs well in moist soils, but good soil drainage is essential. Plants tolerate dry soils, particularly once established. Deadhead spent flowers to promote additional bloom. Plants will spread by rhizomes and will easily self seed in optimum growing conditions.

Noteworthy Characteristics

Agastache foeniculum, commonly known as anise hyssop, is an upright, clump-forming perennial of the mint family that is native to parts of the upper Midwest and Great Plains (Wisconsin to Ontario west to British Columbia and south to Colorado). It is typically found in prairies, dry upland forested areas, plains and fields. It grows to 2-4' tall. It is noted for its mid- to late summer bloom of lavender to purple flowers in terminal spikes and its anise-scented foliage. Square stems are clad with ovate to broad-lanceolate dull green leaves (to 4" long) with toothed margins. Flowers appear in many-flowered verticillasters (false whorls) which are densely packed into showy, cylindrical, terminal flower spikes (3-6" long). Gaps sometimes appear along the flower spike. Individual, tiny, tubular, two-lipped flowers (each to 1/3" long) have no fragrance. Flowers are attractive to bees (good nectar plant), hummingbirds and butterflies. Aromatic leaves can be used to make herbal teas or jellies. Seeds can be added to cookies or muffins. Dried leaves can be added to potpourris. Agastache comes from the Greek words for “much” (agan) and “grain stalk” (stachys) in reference to the flower spikes. Foeniculum comes from a Latin word meaning hay.

Problems

No serious insect or disease problems. Crown/root rot may develop in poorly drained soils. Watch for rust, powdery mildew and leaf spots.

Garden Uses

Borders, wildflower gardens, herb gardens, butterfly gardens or meadows. Flower spikes are attractive additions to fresh cut or dried arrangements.