Lonicera sempervirens
Common Name: trumpet honeysuckle
Type: Vine
Family: Caprifoliaceae
Native Range: Southeastern United States
Zone: 4 to 9
Height: 8.00 to 15.00 feet
Spread: 3.00 to 6.00 feet
Bloom Time: May to June
Bloom Description: Scarlet/orange with yellow inside
Sun: Full sun
Water: Medium
Maintenance: Low
Suggested Use: Naturalize
Flower: Showy
Attracts: Birds, Hummingbirds, Butterflies
Fruit: Showy
Tolerate: Deer, Clay Soil, Black Walnut

Culture

Easily grown in average, medium, well-drained soil in full sun. Tolerates shade, but the profuseness of flowering is inversely proportional to the amount of shade. Adapts to a wide range of soils. Prefers moist, loamy soils. Blooms primarily on previous year's stems, so prune to shape after flowering.

Noteworthy Characteristics

Trumpet honeysuckle is a vigorous, deciduous, twining vine which typically grows 10-15' (less frequently to 20') and is one of the showiest of the vining honeysuckles. Large, non-fragrant, narrow, trumpet-shaped flowers are scarlet to orangish red on the outside and yellowish inside. Flowers appear in late spring at stem ends in whorled clusters. Flowers give way to small red berries which mature in fall and are attractive to birds. Oval, bluish-green leaves are glaucous beneath. This vine is evergreen in the warm winter climates of the deep South, hence the species name of sempervirens (meaning "evergreen" in Latin). Trumpet honeysuckle has escaped cultivation and naturalized in some areas of central and southern Missouri.

Problems

No serious insect or disease problems.

Garden Uses

Best grown on trellises, fences, arbors or pergolas.