Magnolia 'Jane'
Common Name: magnolia
Type: Deciduous shrub
Family: Magnoliaceae
Zone: 4 to 8
Height: 10.00 to 15.00 feet
Spread: 8.00 to 12.00 feet
Bloom Time: April to May
Bloom Description: Reddish purple with white interior
Sun: Full sun to part shade
Water: Medium
Maintenance: Medium
Suggested Use: Hedge, Flowering Tree
Flower: Showy
Tolerate: Clay Soil, Air Pollution

Culture

Best grown in moist, organically rich, acidic, well-drained loams in full sun to part shade. Best sited in a location protected from high winds (minimize potential damage to leaves), but generally avoid southern exposures close to houses where the buds may be induced to open too early in spring. This is a late-blooming magnolia that is less apt to suffer frost damage in spring. Mulch root zone. Good air circulation may reduce onset of powdery mildew.

Noteworthy Characteristics

The genus Magnolia consists of about 100 species (plus numerous additional hybrids and cultivars) of deciduous or evergreen trees and shrubs. Most plants feature large simple leaves and showy, sometimes fragrant flowers (yellow, white, pink or purple) which bloom in early spring before or while the leaves are emerging or in late spring to summer when trees are fully leaved.

Genus name honors Pierre Magnol, French botanist (1638-1715).

‘Jane’ is a cross between M. liliiflora ‘Nigra’ and M. stellata ‘Rosea’. It is part of the Little Girl Series (‘Ann’, ‘Betty’, ‘Jane’, ‘Judy’, ‘Pinkie’, ‘Randy’, ‘Ricki’ and ‘Susan’) of hybrid magnolias that were developed at the National Arboretum in the mid-1950s by Francis DeVos and William Kosar. Plants in this series flower about 2-4 weeks later than M. stellata and M. x soulangiana, thus reducing the risk of damage to flowers from late spring frosts. ‘Jane’ is primarily noted for its shrubby habit, large reddish-purple flowers with white interiors and late bloom (mid-April to early May). It is a slow-growing, deciduous shrub or small tree that typically rises over time to 10-15’ tall with a spread to 8-12’ wide. Large cup-shaped flowers (to 8” diameter) are reddish-purple with white inside. Flowers bloom shortly before the foliage begins to appear. Flowers may sporadically repeat bloom in mid-summer. Ovate leaves (to 6” long) emerge with copper-red tints in spring, turn dark green by late spring and finally acquire yellow to bronze-copper tones in fall.

Problems

No serious insect or disease problems. Potential disease problems include leaf spots, anthracnose, canker, dieback and powdery mildew. Potential insect problems include weevils, snails, scale and thrips.

Garden Uses

Beautiful specimen flowering shrub for lawns, foundations, shrub borders or woodland peripheries. May be grown as a tall informal hedge.