Agastache 'Blue Fortune'

Tried and Trouble-free Recommended by 11 Professionals
Common Name: giant hyssop
Type: Herbaceous perennial
Family: Lamiaceae
Zone: 5 to 9
Height: 2.00 to 3.00 feet
Spread: 1.50 to 2.00 feet
Bloom Time: July to September
Bloom Description: Lavender blue
Sun: Full sun to part shade
Water: Medium
Maintenance: Low
Suggested Use: Annual, Herb
Flower: Showy
Leaf: Fragrant
Attracts: Butterflies
Tolerate: Deer

Culture

Easily grown in average, medium moisture, well-drained soils in full sun to part shade. Best in full sun. Good soil drainage is essential. Plants will perform poorly and may not survive winter in hard clay soils that retain moisture. Plants tolerate heat and some dry soils once established. Deadhead spent flowers to promote additional bloom. Agastache hybrids are typically winter hardy to at least USDA Zone 6. Where winter survival is a potential problem, plants should be sited in protected locations (e.g., southern exposures) with leaf and flower stems being left in place over winter for additional protection. Sandy/gravelly mulches will protect plants and help to avoid onset of rot. Hybrids grown from seed will usually not come true.

Noteworthy Characteristics

Agastache, commonly called giant hyssop, is a genus containing about 30 species of upright herbaceous perennials, most of which are native to North America.

Agastache hybrids often have showier flowers and better winter hardiness than species plants. Hybrid flowers come in a variety of different flower colors including shades of red, orange, pink, yellow and white. Hybrids typically feature dense terminal spikes of tiny 2-lipped tubular flowers which bloom mid-summer to fall in many-flowered verticillasters (false whorls) atop 2-4’ tall stiff square stems clad with opposite pairs of serrate, fragrant (anise/licorice scented) gray-green to medium green leaves. Flowers are attractive to bees, hummingbirds and butterflies.

Genus name comes from the Greek words agan meaning very much and stachys meaning an ear of wheat in reference to the flower spikes.

'Blue Fortune' features tiny, tube-shaped, lavender-blue flowers tightly packed in rounded verticillasters (false whorls) in 4" long interrupted terminal spikes atop stiff square stems typically growing to 3' tall. Flowers bloom freely over a long summer to early fall bloom period and are attractive to butterflies. Ovate-lanceolate leaves (to 4" long) are downy beneath and have a pleasant minty-anise fragrance. Leaves may be used in potpourris or to flavor cold drinks.

Problems

No serious insect or disease problems. Crown/root rot may develop in poorly drained soils. Watch for rust, powdery mildew and leaf spots.

Garden Uses

Bold, aromatic, long-blooming perennials for sunny borders, cottage gardens or butterfly gardens. Effective near patios and along walkways. Good cut flower.